The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) provided an online press briefing for journalists via Zoom last week, with three of the researchers there to discuss results. Very few organisms on Earth produce phosphine, and very few if any are capable of surviving in the extreme conditions in the Venusian cloud decks. As we have been saying for quite some time now, the truth is out there. 203-4920 Dundas Street West Toronto ON M9A 1B7. And scientists say it's unclear how this could happen without help from alien life. No further transits will be visible until 2117. A series of probes were sent to Venus during the 60s, 70s and 80s. The RAS also issued a news release . 25K Views. Video via Royal Astronomical Society. "Before its quite dramatic, runaway greenhouse effect, the surface was pretty habitable," says Clara Sousa-Silva at MIT told NPR. What's exciting is that this is the first detection of a possible sign of life for which we have no plausible alternative explanation. The discovery of the gas on Earth's closest neighbor could open up a new era of science if the hints of life are confirmed by additional telescopes or future space missions. An international team of astronomers at the Royal Astronomical Society reported on Monday, September 14, that they have detected phosphine — a possible signature of life — in Venus' atmosphere for the first time. This study is motivated by the possibility of determining the large-body meteoroid flux at the orbit of Venus. Unfortunately, there's no 100 per cent guarantee that life is hiding away on Venus – yet. Why does that matter? ESO / M. Kornmesser / L. Calçada & NASA / JPL / Caltech This implied that phosphine was present, and absorbing light as it passed … A 'Transit of Venus' happens when Venus is seen in silhouette against the bright face of the Sun. Artist's impression of Venus, with an inset showing a representation of the phosphine molecules detected in the high cloud decks. The clouds in the sky are hardly inviting, containing droplets of 90% sulphuric acid. Scientists believe that millions of years ago, Venus actually had oceans of liquid water like Earth. The discovery of the gas on Earth's closest neighbor could open up a new era of science if the hints of life are confirmed by additional telescopes or future space missions. Related Videos. The team first spotted the phosphine using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii and confirmed it using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope in Chile. Phosphine can turn up on a planet in many different ways. The significant announcement was made by the Royal Astronomical Society in a press conference on Monday. THE ROYAL Astronomical Society announced the exciting news that scientists have detected a gas associated with a sign of life in the acidic clouds of Venus. In astronomy, a 'transit' occurs when a smaller body passes in front of a larger one. They are amazing to be so flexible,” she said. Atoms and molecules absorb light at very specific and unique wavelengths, and the resulting 'absorption spectrum’ revealed a gap at the wavelength of phosphine. However these only produce very small amounts, far less than would be necessary to explain the observations. This confirmed the initial detection, and no other known molecule can explain the observed features. Research News. “Now, we have raised Venus higher up on the ladder of interesting targets.” The research is published in a paper in the journal Nature Astronomy . The Royal Astronomical Society believes that there could be life on Venus after a gas called phosphine has been discovered. Experts at the Royal Astronomical Society have announced phosphine has been discovered in the atmosphere of Venus. Traces of phosphine in Earth's atmosphere are directly linked to human and microbial activity. The search for signs of life on Mars is already under way. We like the trusty Observer’s Handbook from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada; it gives the time of the Venus-Saturn conjunction as December 11, 2019, at 04:00 UTC. Abstract. At the Royal Astronomical Society press briefing on September 14th announcing the discovery, Sara Seager (MIT) spoke about the possibility of a collaboration with Rocket Lab. Atoms and molecules absorb light at very specific and unique wavelengths, and the resulting 'absorption spectrum’ revealed a gap at the wavelength of phosphine. Thanks to the ever-valuable work of astronomers, we now know that Venus boasts potential signs of a little thing called life. Phosphine is widely accepted as being a "promising sign of life", when found in a rocky planet's atmosphere. Could there be life on Venus? The Royal Astronomical Society announced today that phosphine molecules have been observed from Earth in the atmosphere of Venus. Why is it interesting?